Peace Art

What a helpless situation we’re in. As we watch terrible events occurring all around the world, and ask ourselves questions about who is right/who is wrong, whether or not it matters, isn’t there a way to just move beyond it? Is it any wonder we turn to what gives us a sense of peace – we’re not ignoring it, we’re just focusing on what will heal the world. Here are some bits we found that focus on that particular notion:

Non-Sign II - Lead Pencil Peace Arch

Non-Sign II – Lead Pencil Peace Arch

Non Sign II -Lead Pencil Peace Arch

Non Sign II -Lead Pencil Peace Arch

Non Sign II -Lead Pencil Peace Arch

Non Sign II -Lead Pencil Peace Arch

Non Sign II -Lead Pencil Peace Arch

Non Sign II -Lead Pencil Peace Arch

1) The “Non-Sign II” art installation at the new Peace Arch Land Port of Entry in Blaine, Washington was recognized in the Americans for the Arts 2011 Public Art Network Year in Review.  It was one of 47 projects out of 430 entries and the single awardee of four GSA entries.

The artwork, produced by artists Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo of Seattle-based Lead Pencil Studio, greets travellers as they are crossing from Canada into the United States.  Ms Han and Mr Mihalyo received the commission to produce this artwork through the federal government’s Art-In-Architecture program.

The artwork is part of a three-year modernization of the Peace Arch Land Port of Entry completed in 2011. The “Non-Sign II” is made from small stainless steel rods that are assembled together to create the negative space of a billboard. While most billboards draw attention away from the landscape “Non-Sign II’ frames the landscape, focusing attention back on it. [SOURCE]

PeaceArt-anoukvogelfoldingforpeace2

Folding for Peace – Anouk Vogel

PeaceArt-anoukvogelfoldingforpeace3

Folding for Peace – Anouk Vogel

PeaceArt-anoukvogelfoldingforpeace4

Folding for Peace – Anouk Vogel

PeaceArt-anoukvogelfoldingforpeace6

Folding for Peace – Anouk Vogel

 

Folding for Peace - Anouk Vogel

Folding for Peace – Anouk Vogel

2) Folding for Peace is a white paper garden in Nagasaki, Japan realized by Swiss designer Anouk Vogel. The patch of faux flowers are aligned in a circular bed, angelically standing tall and vibrant against a naturally viridescent backdrop. The piece was commissioned by the Gardening World Cup and awarded the Silver Medal and Judges’ Special Award at the Festival of Flowers and World Peace.

Inspired by the Japanese legend that guarantees good fortune in life and health, in the form of a wish, to anyone who practices the paper folding art of origami to create one thousand cranes, the outdoor installation represents a wish for world peace. [SOURCE]

Wall for Peace - Anil Revri

Wall for Peace – Anil Revri

PeaceArt-Anil Revri's Wall for Peace1

3) A compelling art installation at Dulles International Airport in Washington, D.C., urges visitors to consider the messages of peace enshrined in the world’s major religions. Created by Anil Revri, “Wall for Peace” is a seven-foot-tall and six-foot-long block decorated by a ticker-tape-like stream of LED messages of peace from the holy books of Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism and Sikhism. [SOURCE]

IMAGINE PEACE - Yoko Ono

IMAGINE PEACE – Yoko Ono

IMAGINE PEACE - Yoko Ono

IMAGINE PEACE – Yoko Ono

IMAGINE PEACE - Yoko Ono

IMAGINE PEACE – Yoko Ono

4) “The exhibition has a feeling of complicity and continuity, though it is comprised of areas of work by Ono and Lennon operating as solo artists and as a couple in the 1960s —  including installations of John and Yoko’s Year of Peace that are designed to help visitors spread the message of love and peace through the distribution of ephemera, like the iconic black and white IMAGINE PEACE buttons; and also includes a selection of Ono’s recent solo works. Among the latter — and among the most powerfully communicative objects in the show — is her over-sized chess board, Play it By Trust. Recalling Ono’s penchant for painting everyday things white in order to refocus our perspective on their universal and symbolic qualities, the board is a visceral reminder that it’s impossible to fight an enemy who is indistinguishable from yourself. Moreover, that we are all ultimately connected, the same, rendering the fundamental adversarial stance of war absurd and untenable.” Shana Nys Dambrot [SOURCE]

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